Affect, Messiness and Values in Learning Design: Reflecting on the Alzheimer Society Ireland Showcase

Start at the end

At the end of an excellent day organised by The Alzheimer Society of Ireland, Flexible Education Norway and Ic Dien a further education college in Belgium, we went upstairs to a computer lab, something I had imaged no longer existed. We gathered round PC’s to review the module created by the team to support family carers of people with Dementia – see the project website for further information.

A small group of us started to talk our way through the site, asking questions like, will this be screen reader compliant, does the flow work here, how do I get back, is it clear what to do on this page, should the title here be changed to make the purpose clearer. What gave us the sense we had a legitimate right to comment, to second guess the designer. Well, for one he had asked us to second guess him, to sense check the module. So how do we know, what do we base our judgement on as we talk through our questions, we use words like “I think”, “I feel”, we talk about familiar forms which we think “work” we draw out positive and negatives experiences. Experience counts both ways, it can be used “in my experience” to call on patterns “you know” work, and also lack of experience, and “I am not familiar with this but …” Bringing the less sure user into the narrative.

This seems to touch on something that came up through the day, about how one decides on what to do. In our work creating online material with the aim of enabling individual transformation for values based organisations, how is it we know? Does working with values based organisations make any difference, does it make a difference that the learning is informal? Isn’t it just learning, or at best online learning we need to consider? When people talked about their judgement, how they knew, what informed decisions, it was not the online that carried the most weight but experience of learning and working directly with clients, people grounded their comments in real and imagined learners. Talked about how they felt, whether they felt something was right and fitted with what they knew of the learners and organisational values, and when things didn’t feel right and asking themselves why. Of course it is just as important to ask questions of the comfortable decisions as the ones that are troublesome, but what it emphasised for me is the personal craft of creating a course.

Never knowingly neat and tidy

The sense of learning in these contexts as a messy problem with complex, incomplete and clumsy solutions emerged at the start of the day.  It was great to hear the explicit recognition of the difference between a project plan, a neat timetable of discrete activities, and the reality. The need to inhabit all the phases at the same time, patterns  of activities blur into each other, for example, in design you look back to your experience and forward to the live course,  and as you do you are conditioned by production. Or, in writing you move to and from the image of the learner you started writing for, the one you are bringing into being through writing and looking forward to what it will enable them to do and how you will know if it has worked. These cycles are not captured in linear project plans with set start and end dates. Uncertainty is useful, it makes you question things, the need to keep changing, asking yourself what is the right thing to do, recognising the temporality of solutions. So it was useful to see this at the start of the day with Gibbs Reflective cycle as a project management methodology, it was quite a clear and bold statement in a world of online learning design which often talks about Agile or other such methods.

reflective-cycle.jpg
Figure 1: Kari Olstad Flexible Education Norway talks about Gibbs Reflective Cycle as a Project Management Approach, Ronald Macintyre CC BY SA 4.0

 

It was bold, and even bolder because it asked us to consider how well project management methods borrowed from tech company’s suited values based organisations, or indeed any organisations development of learning materials. Certainly some do, if I replaced clumsy temporal solutions with “rolling beta”, it probably is similar enough, and within “sprints” in software development are we pretending people are not reflecting on their practice. However, I think what was different and the risk with some of the linear models where “reflection on action” is not explicit is the tendency to look down, to focus on the plan, on the detail, and not “look up”, to place what you are doing in its broader context, the values of the organisation, the needs of the learner, and crucially what learning enables them to do.

Just to close thanks to Fergus Timmons Alzheimer Society of Ireland for inviting me and sense checking this account of the day.

Here is a link to my own presentation

Best Wishes

 

Ronald.

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Reflecting on a day in Govan: Voluntary Sector Studies Network Border Crossing

A couple of weeks ago I spent a day in Govan at the Pearce Institute a place with a story all of its own and a fitting veneue for the Voluntary Sector Studies Network foray into Scotland, a first foray for them, and a first attendance at one of their events for me. The theme was Border Crossing,  #VSSNBorders and the background, well #Brexit and #indyref2.

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Figure 1: Govan as the Centre of Strathclyde, Macintyre, 2017, CC BY SA 4.0

But first we were treated to a history of Govan, in particular its role at the centre of the Kingdom of Strathclyde and as home to the famous “hog backs” housed in Govan Cathedral. It was probably a bit light on the industrial history, so not much Rab C Nesbit, or Swing Hammer Swing, which might dominate our present imagination, and more on its pre and just industrialising past.

It was a useful way to start, getting us to think about temporality, space, place and meaning. It particuarily resonated with the first group of talks which looked at super diverse neighbourhoods, and the role of some places in always being places where newcomers arrived by Claire Bynner followed by a paper on volunteering and civic engagement by young people whose families had migrated from other places.

The next two slots were concerned with voluntary organisations, Matthew Dutton long term study of how voluntary sector organisations position themselves in relation to the state, a state that which might be argued to be failing (otherwise they wouldnt need to exist), but at the same time is the only source of succour and funds their activities was really interesting. Katey Tabner also dealt with inbetweenness in her presentation, looking at the role of infrastructure organisations that have sprung up to support community groups who have taken up the offer of “Community Empowerment”. An interesting space, where in my personal experience the state often looks to transfer risk to communities and the organisation that arise or have been funded by the state to support this often exist in the kind of uncertain space highlighted by Dutton.

Now back to the Border Crossing. The talk that made a big impression was the one by Gareth Morgan on charity law across the jurisdictions. Which as well as being delivered at break neck speed also had the pointed question of whether VSSN was a registered charity in Scotland, as it might need to be if it planned to continue its own border crossing

Ronald Macintyre

Action Research and Learning Design

The issue is examining why it is we follow a particular track

oransay

Credit: Ronald Macintrye, Postal Deliveries to the tidal Isle of Oransay, CC BY-SA 4.0

The Evaluation of Learning Experience of e-Learning Special Interest Group (ELESIG) recently launched a MOOC on the EU MOOC platform and aggregator EMMA. The MOOC is titled “Researching Learners experiences and use of technology using action research” #LERMOOC. It includes linked case studies based on partnership work by OEPS. In them I reflect on the three phases of content development, reflecting on design, production and use. I explore the value and tensions around working in partnership with an external organisation, in this example Parkinson’s UK.

The value of partnership comes from getting closer to the learners and their experiences through working with practitioners, in particular in the design phase where you can surface and test assumptions, evaluating them as part of the design process; but also in use, where the materials can be embedded in existing social contexts through the partner’s networks. The tension is often about how systems speak to each other; sometimes these are technical questions, sometimes ones of organisational culture.

The purpose is to create partnerships with organisations to allow you to get closer to understanding the learners, it is exploratory, and the case studies focus on the process, on wayfinding, surfacing my own action research into the learner experience as part of being a reflective practitioner.

Click on this link to read the OEPS case studies.

Ronald Macintyre

Mind Now: this is about learning

Pete Cannell and coauthored a paper at OER17 called Mind the Gap, it is concerned with lifelong learning and the role of free open online resources in filling in and creating routes into learning for those distanced from it, and more broadly reflects on the gaps within those journeys as local authorities colleges retreat from this space and Third Sector organisations look to fill those structural holes as best they can. I selected the title for its double meaning, to be careful, and to remember and keep it in our minds. It was only when I started to listen to Rosa Murray at the recent forum organised jointly by Learning for Sustainability Scotland (LfSS) and OEPS on shared values, my use of to mind’ means ‘to recollect’ and this use is a particularly Scottish thing .

Rosa touched on her work with Rowena Griffiths, asking us to consider whether we “mind enough”; suggesting the need for us to explore what a “pedagogy of minding” looked like (here are the slides). The workshop was about sustainability, and the role of openness and open practices in supporting learning for sustainability. Most attendees were “at home” in this space and looking to learn from OEPS about openness. In the self-organised afternoon discussion groups three clusters emerged:

  • How to use openness in teacher education, how to make it meaningful and engaging in ways that align to their values;
  • How and/or will openness transform education, and if it does what will it look like;
  • How to open up content to use and reuse.

LfSS end of session whiteboard

Big questions, questions that often surface when considering open educational practices. However, the focus on sustainability and equity and social justice did draw out some different issues. In particular, there were questions around who is empowered by openness and ensuring that openness and putting stuff online is not used as an argument for withdrawing support for other activities.  For me this went back to what Rosa said about shared values, and minding.  She suggested there was a particular Scottish focus on sustainability as a question of equity and social justice. For LfSS minding is about learning to care about the world, to mind about inequalities.

Concern about the world, care for the environment, has moved from the margins to the mainstream, to a point where every pupil in Scotland is “entitled” to learn about sustainability. As a movement OER/OEP is a long way from this, more people are using open resources, but do more people care. Is it something to care about, what are the things we ought to care about, and what would a pedagogy of minding about openness look like? An approach to education that plays on the distinctive Scottish sense of minding, of saying “I mind”, a sense between remembering, caution and caring.

Honestly, I have no answers, but I think openness is at the heart of a pedagogy of minding, as both a something that goes in as a value, and is an outcome of caring. If I look at Joe Wilson’s blog post about the UNESCO European Regional Consultation on OER and even further back to the work done on the Open Scotland Declaration, I see the articulation of a particular Scottish approach to openness. As the OER/OEP community looks forward, perhaps it is useful to take a side glance at the work done on sustainability, as the focus on values, and minding, might suggest a way forward.

 

Ronald Macintyre

“The Gathering”

“Hands at the Cuevas de las Manos “, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina Image Source: Mariano, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argentina#/media/File:SantaCruz-CuevaManos-P2210651b.jpg, (CC BY-SA 3.0)

“Hands at the Cuevas de las Manos “, Santa Cruz Province, Argentina, Mariano, CC BY SA 3.0

OEPS will be attending the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) event “The Gathering” on the 22 and 23 of February 2017 with a stall (near the entrance) and a workshop on the 23 of February at 10 am. Why are we operating in this space, after all OEPS is an HE project isn’t it?  The short answer is many of OEPS key partnerships are with Third Sector organisations, and we have something to share about our experiences. Our starting point was research in widening participation which suggests the most effective way to draw someone distanced from learning into education is through partnerships with organisations they trust – see a recent OEPS post about Barriers to participation in online learning. So, we also have plenty to learn from attending.

Rather than reflect on OEPS interest, perhaps a more interesting thing to consider is why the Third Sector is operating in this space. When we consider the role of the Third Sector, we typically think about their role in filling gaps, the spaces left by the public and private sectors, structural holes often experienced most acutely by the most vulnerable in our society. Exclusion is experienced across a range of axes, and these can layer over and accentuate each other.  Our partners tell us education is one of these, and access to good quality free and open as a resource for educators and learners is vital.

We will share our experience of partnership working and using approaches informed by participatory design to develop approaches to engaging people in the design, production and use of OER. Partners from Parkinson’s UK and Scottish Union Learn will be on hand to share experiences. However, we are also aware our experiences are partial, a snapshot.  The workshop is an opportunity for us to share the issues but also to share the questions and learn together. In particular looking at what a future which assumes education and information is free and open look like for Third Sector organisation and for learners/clients they support.

We still have a few spaces left. You will need to register for “The Gathering”  (which is free) before being able to book the workshop.

We look forward to seeing you at the event.

Ronald Macintyre